I’ve experienced more colourism from Jamaican people at home than racism and/or colourism in America.

I have seen racism in America but I have not experienced it. Best believe, the day I experience racism the person who dares will not go unscathed.

Back to Jamaica:

“You too black
How you black so?
Anything too black nuh good”

Let me tell y’all something. A girl with my skin tone growing up in Jamaica MUST be mentally firm, and if she doesn’t have people who love her enough to say there is nothing wrong with who you are, she might grow with resent for black people.

Yes, I said it, resent for black people, low self-esteem, an inferiority complex. She may never recover from harbouring those feelings.

The persons among us who seem to suffer from some mental disorder, using those words and phrases to diminish black people’s self worth, crush their spirit, are a detriment to the black race. To question why someone is so black and use melanin as a verbal weapon comes from a place of ignorance and illiteracy.

Through wisdom and education, I wouldn’t wish to be born any other way. In fact I am glad to be born this way. I applaud every dark skinned woman who knows what this black hypocrisy/colourism is all about, but still, she rises.

I’ve heard people in the entertainment industry refer to Spice as “the black one” and I know how she felt. I might not be a fan of hers and will not buy her album, but I can give her credit where it is due in that “black hypocrisy” is real and it plays on the human psyche.

It is a good thing that she raised this argument in a country where bleaching to look “better” is endemic and “anything too black nuh good”.

Knowledge is power.

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I’ve experienced more colourism from Jamaican people at home than racism and/or colourism in America. I have seen racism in America but I have not experienced it. Best believe, the day I experience racism the person who dares will not go unscathed. Back to Jamaica: “You too black How you black so? Anything...

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